Biblical research

Bible pronunciation guide – a complete guide to pronunciation of difficult biblical names, locations, and other ancient biblical references

The following are pronunciations of often difficult-to-pronounce common biblical words.  Use the phonetic guide below for examples of the various "sounds". If you have suggestions or requests for other biblical pronunciations, please email feedback@bibleblender.com. Phonetic guide a - at, cat, mat, snap ah - father, bother ahr - lard, yard ai - air, care, fair, prayer, there aw - jaw, saw, all, caught ay - [long "a"] day, pay, obey, weigh e, eh - bed, pet, peck ee - [long "e"] beat, easy, seem er – error ew – few, boo, zoo i - [long "i"] tie, sky, side, buy, eye ie [long "i"] tie, sky, side, buy, eye eye [long "i"] tie, sky, side, buy, eye i, ih - it, tip, active ihr - ear, fear o - cot, hot, not oh - [long "o"] bone, go, know, toe oi - boy, destroy oo -

Chronological summary of the New Testament Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John timeline)

It's called the "Synoptic Problem", the perceived contradiction of various events in the four gospels.  Typically this perceived contradiction is chronological.  However, novice readers fail to understand the nuances of ancient writers and their works.  In the ancient Near East, historical events were often grouped by themes or geography and not necessarily presented in chronological order.  Thus, although the stories in the gospels match, they differ in order.  Below is a proposed chronological outline of events in the New Testament gospels as they likely occurred.  However, please note that this is only a proposed ordering of events - most events in the New Testament are not given specific dates/times in the scriptures and thus the table presented below is theoretical only.   Date Description of Event Matthew Mark Luke John Prologue to the

Map of The Twelve Tribes of Israel

The Twelve Tribes of Israel descended from the patriarch Jacob (who was later named Israel). Jacob had 12 sons and at least one daughter (Dinah) by two wives, Leah and Rachel, and two concubines, Zilpah and Bilhah.  Joseph's tribe was split into two factions - Manasseh and Ephraim - in a process involving Isaac's adoption of Joseph's sons and elimination of Reuben's share.  The Twelve Tribes of Israel include: Reuben Simeon Levi Judah Dan Naphtali Gad Asher Issachar Zebulun Joseph Manasseh Ephraim Benjamin Below are two maps of the Twelve Tribes of Israel.  The bottom map is a 1600-era map of the region.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible – Introduction – Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown INTRODUCTION TO THE PENTATEUCH AND HISTORICAL BOOKS by Robert Jamieson The Pentateuch, the name by which the first five books of the Bible are designated, is derived from two Greek words, pente, "five," and teuchos, a "volume," thus signifying the fivefold volume. Originally these books formed one continuous work, as in the Hebrew manuscripts they are still connected in one unbroken roll. At what time they were divided into five portions, each having a separate title, is not known, but it is certain that the distinction dates at or before the time of the Septuagint translation. The names they bear in our English version are borrowed from the Septuagint, and they were applied

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible – Genesis – Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown The Old Testament   THE FIRST BOOK OF MOSES, CALLED GENESIS. Commentary by Robert Jamieson   CHAPTER 1 Ge 1:1, 2. The Creation of Heaven and Earth. 1. In the beginning--a period of remote and unknown antiquity, hid in the depths of eternal ages; and so the phrase is used in Pr 8:22, 23. God--the name of the Supreme Being, signifying in Hebrew, "Strong," "Mighty." It is expressive of omnipotent power; and by its use here in the plural form, is obscurely taught at the opening of the Bible, a doctrine clearly revealed in other parts of it, namely, that though God is one, there is a plurality of persons in the Godhead--Father, Son, and Spirit, who were engaged

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible – Exodus – Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown

THE SECOND BOOK OF MOSES, CALLED EXODUS. Commentary by Robert Jamieson   CHAPTER 1 Ex 1:1-22. Increase of the Israelites. 1. Now these are the names--(See Ge 46:8-26). 7. children of Israel were fruitful--They were living in a land where, according to the testimony of an ancient author, mothers produced three and four sometimes at a birth; and a modern writer declares "the females in Egypt, as well among the human race as among animals, surpass all others in fruitfulness." To this natural circumstance must be added the fulfilment of the promise made to Abraham. 8. Now there arose up a new king--About sixty years after the death of Joseph a revolution took place--by which the old dynasty was overthrown, and upper and lower Egypt were united into one kingdom. Assuming

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible – Leviticus – Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown

THE THIRD BOOK OF MOSES, CALLED LEVITICUS. Commentary by Robert Jamieson   CHAPTER 1 Le 1:1-17. Burnt Offerings of the Herd. 1. the Lord ... spake ... out of the tabernacle--The laws that are contained in the previous record were delivered either to the people publicly from Sinai, or to Moses privately, on the summit of that mountain; but on the completion of the tabernacle, the remainder of the law was announced to the Hebrew leader by an audible voice from the divine glory, which surmounted the mercy seat. 2. Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them--If the subject of communication were of a temporal nature, the Levites were excluded; but if it were a spiritual matter, all the tribes were comprehended under this name (De 27:12). If

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible – Numbers – Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown

THE FOURTH BOOK OF MOSES, CALLED NUMBERS. Commentary by Robert Jamieson   CHAPTER 1 Nu 1:1-54. Moses Numbering the Men of War. 1, 2. on the first day of the second month, &c.--Thirteen months had elapsed since the exodus. About one month had been occupied in the journey; and the rest of the period had been passed in encampment among the recesses of Sinai, where the transactions took place, and the laws, religious and civil, were promulgated, which are contained in the two preceding books. As the tabernacle was erected on the first day of the first month, and the order here mentioned was given on the first day of the second, some think the laws in Leviticus were all given in one month. The Israelites having been formed

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible – Deuteronomy – Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown

THE FIFTH BOOK OF MOSES, CALLED DEUTERONOMY. Commentary by Robert Jamieson CHAPTER 1 De 1:1-46. Moses' Speech at the End of the Fortieth Year. 1. These be the words which Moses spake unto all Israel--The mental condition of the people generally in that infantine age of the Church, and the greater number of them being of young or tender years, rendered it expedient to repeat the laws and counsels which God had given. Accordingly, to furnish a recapitulation of the leading branches of their faith and duty was among the last public services which Moses rendered to Israel. The scene of their delivery was on the plains of Moab where the encampment was pitched on this side Jordan--or, as the Hebrew word may be rendered "on the bank of

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible – Joshua – Robert Jamieson, A.R. Fausset, and David Brown

THE BOOK OF JOSHUA. Commentary by Robert Jamieson   CHAPTER 1 Jos 1:1-18. The Lord Appoints Joshua to Succeed Moses. 1. Now after the death of Moses--Joshua, having been already appointed and designated leader of Israel (Nu 27:18-23), in all probability assumed the reins of government immediately "after the death of Moses." the servant of the Lord--This was the official title of Moses as invested with a special mission to make known the will of God; and it conferred great honor and authority. the Lord spake unto Joshua--probably during the period of public mourning, and either by a direct revelation to the mind of Joshua, or by means of Urim and Thummim (Nu 27:21). This first communication gave a pledge that the divine instructions which, according to the provisions of the