Resources

Clementine Homolies

Clementine literature (also called Clementina, Pseudo-Clementine Writings, Kerygmata Petrou, Clementine Romance) purport to contain a record made by one Clement (whom the narrative identifies as both Pope Clement I, and Domitian's cousin Titus Flavius Clemens) of discourses involving the Apostle Peter, together with an account of the circumstances under which Clement came to be Peter's travelling companion, and of other details of Clement's family history. Epistle of Peter to James Peter to James, the lord and bishop of the holy Church, under the Father of all, through Jesus Christ, wishes peace always. Chapter I. Doctrine of Reserve Knowing, my brother, your eager desire after that which is for the advantage of us all, I beg and beseech you not to communicate to any one of the Gentiles the books of

The Books of Adam and Eve

VITA ADAE ET EVAE From "The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament" R.H. Charles Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913 i 1 When they were driven out from paradise, they made themselves a booth, and spent seven days mourning and lamenting in great grief. ii 1 But after seven days, they began to be hungry and started to look for victual to eat, and they 2 found it not. Then Eve said to Adam: 'My lord, I am hungry. Go, look for (something) for us to eat. Perchance the Lord God will look back and pity us and recall us to the place in which we were before. iii I And Adam arose and walked seven days over all that land, and found no victual such as they 2 used to have in paradise. And Eve said

Life of Adam and Eve

SLAVONIC VITA ADAE ET EVAE From-The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament R.H. Charles Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1913 xxviii 1 And we sat together before the gate of paradise, Adam weeping with his face bent down to the earth, lay on the ground lamenting. And seven days passed by and we had nothing 2 to eat and were consumed with great hunger, and I Eve cried with a loud voice: 'Pity me, O Lord, My Creator; for my sake Adam suffereth thus!' xxxix 1 And I said to Adam: 'Rise up! my lord, that we may seek us food; for now my spirit faileth me and my heart within me is brought low.' Then Adam spake to me: 'I have thoughts of 2 killing thee, but I fear since God

The Apocalypse of Adam

Nag Hammadi Codex V,5. Translated by George W. MacRae The revelation of Adam`s origin as told to his son Seth The revelation which Adam taught his son Seth in the seven hundredth year, saying, Listen to my words, my son Seth. When God had created me out of the earth along with Eve, your mother, I went about with her in a glory which she had seen in the Aeon from which we had come forth. She taught me a word of knowledge of the eternal God. And we resembled the great angels, for we were higher than the God who had created us and the powers with him, whom we did not know. Then God, the ruler of the Aeons and the powers, divided us in wrath. Then

The Book of Adam

THE BOOK OF ADAM Translated from the Georgian original. Translator: J.-P. Mahe Source: commissioned for this electronic edition. Discovery of Expulsion 1.1 It came to pass, when Adam went out from paradise with his wife Eve, they went out at the eastern part of paradise. And Adam made a hut to live in. They both entered (it) and resided there for seven days. They both wept with abundant tears for they regretted the residences of the kingdom from which they had been expelled. 2.1 And after seven "days, they were hungry and looked for something to eat. 2.2 Eve told Adam: "Adam, my lord, arise and (go) search for food for me that we may eat, while waiting to try -- who knows -- (that) for the Lord to accept us

The Second Treatise of the Great Seth

Translated by Roger A. Bullard and Joseph A. Gibbons And the perfect Majesty is at rest in the ineffable light, in the truth of the mother of all these, and all of you that attain to me, to me alone who am perfect, because of the Word. For I exist with all the greatness of the Spirit, which is a friend to us and our kindred alike, since I brought forth a word to the glory of our Father, through his goodness, as well as an imperishable thought; that is, the Word within him - it is slavery that we shall die with Christ - and an imperishable and undefiled thought, an incomprehensible marvel, the writing of the ineffable water which is the word from us.

1 Enoch

SECTION ONE Chapters 1-36, I-XXXVI Chapter 1, I 1. The words of the blessing of Enoch, wherewith he blessed the elect and righteous, who will be living in the day of tribulation, when all the wicked and godless are to be removed. 2. And he took up his parable and said -Enoch a righteous man, whose eyes were opened by God, saw the vision of the Holy One in the heavens, which the angels showed me, and from them I heard everything, and from them I understood as I saw, but not for this generation, but for a remote one which is for to come. 3. Concerning the elect I said, and took up my parable concerning them: The Holy Great One will come forth from His dwelling, 4. And

Melchizedek

Translated by Søren Giversen and Birger A. Pearson Jesus Christ, the Son of God [...] from ... ... (2 lines unrecoverable) ... the aeons, that I might tell all of the aeons, and, in (the case of) each one of the aeons, that I might tell the nature of the aeon, what it is, and that I might put on friendship and goodness as a garment, O brother, [...] and ... ... (7 lines unrecoverable) ... their end [...]. And he will reveal to them the truth [...] in ... ... (3 lines unrecoverable) ... proverb(s) ... ... (lines 26-eop, and first 2 lines of next page, unrecoverable) ... at first in parables and riddles [...] proclaim them. Death will tremble and be angry, not only he himself, but also his fellow world-ruling archons,

The Testament of Abraham

I. Abraham lived the measure of his life, nine hundred and ninety-five years, and having lived all the years of his life in quietness, gentleness, and righteousness, the righteous one was exceeding hospitable; for, pitching his tent in the cross-ways at the oak of Mamre, he received every one, both rich and poor, kings and rulers, the maimed and the helpless, friends and strangers, neighbours and travellers, all alike did the devout, all-holy, righteous, and hospitable Abraham entertain. Even upon him, however, there came the common, inexorable, bitter lot of death, and the uncertain end of life. Therefore the Lord God, summoning his archangel Michael, said to him: Go down, chief- captain Michael, to Abraham and speak to him concerning his death, that he may

The Apocalypse of Abraham

"The Apocalypse of Abraham belongs to a body of Abraham literature flourishing about the time of Christ. "The Book is essentially Jewish," wrote George H. Box, with "features . . . which suggest Essene origin." From the Essenes it passed, he suggested, "to Ebionite circles . . . and thence, in some form, found its way into Gnostic circles," though "Gnostic elements in our Book are not very pronounced." --Dr. Hugh Nibley (Abraham in Egypt) TRANSLATION #1 Translator unknown TRANSLATION #2 Translator unknown Chapter 1 1. On the day I was guarding the gods of my father Terah and the gods of my brother Nahor, while I was testing (to find out) which god is in truth the strongest, 2. I (then) Abraham, at the time when my lot came, when I