Apocrypha

1 Esdras

1 Esdras [1] Josiah kept the passover to his Lord in Jerusalem; he killed the passover lamb on the fourteenth day of the first month, [2] having placed the priests according to their divisions, arrayed in their garments, in the temple of the Lord. [3] And he told the Levites, the temple servants of Israel, that they should sanctify themselves to the Lord and put the holy ark of the Lord in the house which Solomon the king, the son of David, had built; [4] and he said, "You need no longer carry it upon your shoulders. Now worship the Lord your God and serve his people Israel; and prepare yourselves by your families and kindred, [5] in accordance with the directions of David king of Israel and the magnificence

2 Esdras

2 Esdras 4Ezra.1 [1] The second book of the prophet Ezra the son of Seraiah, son of Azariah, son of Hilkiah, son of Shallum, son of Zadok, son of Ahitub, [2] son of Ahijah, son of Phinehas, son of Eli, son of Amariah, son of Azariah, son of Meraioth, son of Arna, son of Uzzi, son of Borith, son of Abishua, son of Phinehas, son of Eleazar, [3] son of Aaron, of the tribe of Levi, who was a captive in the country of the Medes in the reign of Artaxerxes, king of the Persians. [4] The word of the Lord came to me, saying, [5] "Go and declare to my people their evil deeds, and to their children the iniquities which they have committed against me, so that they may

1 Maccabees

1 Maccabees 1Mac.1 [1] After Alexander son of Philip, the Macedonian, who came from the land of Kittim, had defeated Darius, king of the Persians and the Medes, he succeeded him as king. (He had previously become king of Greece.) [2] He fought many battles, conquered strongholds, and put to death the kings of the earth. [3] He advanced to the ends of the earth, and plundered many nations. When the earth became quiet before him, he was exalted, and his heart was lifted up. [4] He gathered a very strong army and ruled over countries, nations, and princes, and they became tributary to him. [5] After this he fell sick and perceived that he was dying. [6] So he summoned his most honored officers, who had been brought up with him

2 Maccabees

2 Maccabees 2Mac.1 [1] The Jewish brethren in Jerusalem and those in the land of Judea, To their Jewish brethren in Egypt, Greeting, and good peace. [2] May God do good to you, and may he remember his covenant with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob, his faithful servants. [3] May he give you all a heart to worship him and to do his will with a strong heart and a willing spirit. [4] May he open your heart to his law and his commandments, and may he bring peace. [5] May he hear your prayers and be reconciled to you, and may he not forsake you in time of evil. [6] We are now praying for you here. [7] In the reign of Demetrius, in the one hundred and sixty-ninth year, we Jews

3 Maccabees

3 Maccabees 3Mac.1 [1] When Philopator learned from those who returned that the regions which he had controlled had been seized by Antiochus, he gave orders to all his forces, both infantry and cavalry, took with him his sister Arsinoe, and marched out to the region near Raphia, where Antiochus's supporters were encamped. [2] But a certain Theodotus, determined to carry out the plot he had devised, took with him the best of the Ptolemaic arms that had been previously issued to him, and crossed over by night to the tent of Ptolemy, intending single-handed to kill him and thereby end the war. [3] But Dositheus, known as the son of Drimylus, a Jew by birth who later changed his religion and apostatized from the ancestral traditions, had led

4 Maccabees

4Mac.1 [1] The subject that I am about to discuss is most philosophical, that is, whether devout reason is sovereign over the emotions. So it is right for me to advise you to pay earnest attention to philosophy. [2] For the subject is essential to everyone who is seeking knowledge, and in addition it includes the praise of the highest virtue -- I mean, of course, rational judgment. [3] If, then, it is evident that reason rules over those emotions that hinder self-control, namely, gluttony and lust, [4] it is also clear that it masters the emotions that hinder one from justice, such as malice, and those that stand in the way of courage, namely anger, fear, and pain. [5] Some might perhaps ask, "If reason rules the emotions, why

Letter of Jeremiah

EpJer.6 [1] A copy of a letter which Jeremiah sent to those who were to be taken to Babylon as captives by the king of the Babylonians, to give them the message which God had commanded him. [2] Because of the sins which you have committed before God, you will be taken to Babylon as captives by Nebuchadnezzar, king of the Babylonians. [3] Therefore when you have come to Babylon you will remain there for many years, for a long time, up to seven generations; after that I will bring you away from there in peace. [4] Now in Babylon you will see gods made of silver and gold and wood, which are carried on men's shoulders and inspire fear in the heathen. [5] So take care not to become

Prayer of Azariah

1 [2] Then Azariah stood and offered this prayer; in the midst of the fire he opened his mouth and said: [3] "Blessed art thou, O Lord, God of our fathers, and worthy of praise; and thy name is glorified for ever. [4] For thou art just in all that thou hast done to us, and all thy works are true and thy ways right, and all thy judgments are truth. [5] Thou hast executed true judgments in all that thou hast brought upon us and upon Jerusalem, the holy city of our fathers, for in truth and justice thou hast brought all this upon us because of our sins. [6] For we have sinfully and lawlessly departed from thee, and have sinned in all things and have not obeyed

Baruch

Bar.1 [1] These are the words of the book which Baruch the son of Neraiah, son of Mahseiah, son of Zedekiah, son of Hasadiah, son of Hilkiah, wrote in Babylon, [2] in the fifth year, on the seventh day of the month, at the time when the Chaldeans took Jerusalem and burned it with fire. [3] And Baruch read the words of this book in the hearing of Jeconiah the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and in the hearing of all the people who came to hear the book, [4] and in the hearing of the mighty men and the princes, and in the hearing of the elders, and in the hearing of all the people, small and great, all who dwelt in Babylon by the river Sud. [5]

Prayer of Manasseh

PrMan.1 [2] thou who hast made heaven and earth with all their order; [3] who hast shackled the sea by thy word of command, who hast confined the deep and sealed it with thy terrible and glorious name; [4] at whom all things shudder, and tremble before thy power, [5] for thy glorious splendor cannot be borne, and the wrath of thy threat to sinners is irresistible; [6] yet immeasurable and unsearchable is thy promised mercy, [7] for thou art the Lord Most High, of great compassion, long-suffering, and very merciful, and repentest over the evils of men. Thou, O Lord, according to thy great goodness hast promised repentance and forgiveness to those who have sinned against thee; and in the multitude of thy mercies thou hast appointed repentance for sinners,