Month: April 2020

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Regulations concerning throwing from one ground into another.

p. 189 TRACT SABBATH. CHAPTER XI. REGULATIONS CONCERNING THROWING FROM ONE GROUND INTO ANOTHER. MISHNA: One who throws a thing from private into public or from public into private ground is culpable. From private into private ground, by way of public ground, R. Aqiba holds him to be culpable, but the sages declare him free. How so? If two balconies face each other across a street, one who transfers or throws something from one into the other is free; if the two balconies, however, are in the same building, he who transfers a thing from one into the other is culpable, but he who throws is free; because the work of the Levites (in the tabernacle) was as follows: From two wagons facing each other in public ground boards

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Synopsis of subjects of Volume II of the Tract Sabbath

SYNOPSIS OF SUBJECTS OF VOLUME II.--TRACT SABBATH, xli CHAPTER XI. REGULATIONS CONCERNING THROWING FROM ONE GROUND INTO ANOTHER, 189 CHAPTER XII. REGULATIONS CONCERNING BUILDING, PLOUGHING, ETC., ON THE SABBATH, 204 CHAPTER XIII. REGULATIONS CONCERNING WEAVING, TEARING, HUNTING, ETC., ON THE SABBATH, 213 CHAPTER XIV. REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE CATCHING OF REPTILES, ANIMALS AND BIRDS, 219 CHAPTER XV. REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE TYING AND UNTYING OF KNOTS ON THE SABBATH, 230 CHAPTER XVI. REGULATIONS CONCERNING ARTICLES WHICH MAY BE SAVED FROM A CONFLAGRATION ON SABBATH, 239 CHAPTER XVII. REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE HANDLING OF UTENSILS AND FURNITURE ON THE SABBATH, 266 p. xl PAGE CHAPTER XVIII. REGULATIONS REGARDING THE CLEARING OFF OF REQUIRED SPACE, THE ASSISTANCE TO BE GIVEN CATTLE WHEN GIVING BIRTH TO THEIR YOUNG AND TO WOMEN ABOUT TO BE CONFINED, 276 CHAPTER XIX. REGULATION'S ORDAINED By R. ELIEZER CONCERNING CIRCUMCISION ON THE SABBATH, 288 CHAPTER XX. REGULATIONS CONCERNING CERTAIN

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Further regulations concerning the prescribed quantity of things to be stored.

p. 171 CHAPTER X. FURTHER REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE PRESCRIBED QUANTITY OF THINGS TO BE STORED. MISHNA I.: One who had stored anything for planting, sampling, or medicinal purposes (before the Sabbath) and carried some of it out (into public ground) on the Sabbath, be it ever so small a quantity, is liable for a sin-offering. Any one else, however, is culpable only then if (he carried out) the prescribed quantity. Even the one who had stored is culpable only for the prescribed quantity, if he brought the thing carried out by him back (to private ground). GEMARA: For what purpose is it said in the Mishna, "One who stored anything"? Would it not be sufficient to say, "One who carried out things intended for planting, sampling, or medicinal purposes,

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Rabbi Aqiba’s regulations on different subjects.

p. 154 CHAPTER IX. RABBI AQIBA'S REGULATIONS ON DIFFERENT SUBJECTS. MISHNA I.: R. Aqiba said: Whence do we deduce that one who carries an idol is as unclean (ritually) as a woman suffering from menstruation? From the passage [Isaiah, xxx. 23]: "Thou wilt cast them away as a filthy thing. 1 'Get thee hence!', wilt thou say unto them." Thus, in the same manner as a woman suffering from menstruation causes (ritual) uncleanness, so does also an idol. GEMARA: Rabba said: The passage mentioned in the Mishna should be interpreted thus: "Estrange 2 them from thyself as a stranger; Get thee hence, say unto him, but tell him not to come in!" Further Rabba said: It is unanimously conceded that the carrying of idols causes (ritual) uncleanness and hence

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Regulations concerning the prescribed quantities of victuals and beverages which must not be carried about on the Sabbath.

p. 143 CHAPTER VIII. REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE PRESCRIBED QUANTITIES OF VICTUALS AND BEVERAGES WHICH MUST NOT BE CARRIED ABOUT ON THE SABBATH. MISHNA I.: The prescribed quantities (of victuals and beverages) prohibited to be carried about on the Sabbath (are as follows): Sufficient wine in a goblet, which with the addition of a certain quantity of water would make a full goblet of wine (fit to drink); 1 milk to the quantity of a mouthful, honey sufficient to cover a wound with, oil sufficient to anoint a small limb with, and water in quantities sufficient for a medical bath for the eyes. For all other liquids and also of whatever can be poured out, the prescribed quantity is a quarter of a lug (about a quart). R. Simeon

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – The general rule concerning the principal acts of labor on Sabbath.

p. 127 CHAPTER VII. THE GENERAL RULE CONCERNING THE PRINCIPAL ACTS OF LABOR ON SABBATH. MISHNA I.: A general rule was laid down respecting the Sabbath. One who has entirely forgotten the principle of (keeping) the Sabbath and performed many kinds of work on many Sabbath days, is liable to bring but one sin-offering. He, however, who was aware of the principle of Sabbath, but (forgetting the day) committed many acts of labor on Sabbath days, is liable to bring a separate sin-offering for each and every Sabbath day (which he has violated). One who knew that it was Sabbath and performed many kinds of work on different Sabbath days (not knowing that such work was prohibited), is liable to bring a separate sin-offering for every principal act

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Regulations concerning what garments women may go out with on the Sabbath.

p. 107 CHAPTER VI. REGULATIONS CONCERNING WHAT GARMENTS (SERVING AS ORNAMENTS) WOMEN MAY GO OUT WITH ON THE SABBATH. MISHNA I.: In what (ornamental) apparel may a woman go out, and in what may she not go out? A woman is not allowed to go out (even in private ground) either with woollen or linen bands or with straps on her head to keep her hair in tresses (as a precaution lest she enter public ground and take off the bands to show to her friends, thereby becoming guilty of carrying movable property for a distance of four ells or more). Nor is she to bathe herself with the bands on unless loosened. Nor is she to go out with either Totaphoth or Sarbitin on, unless they are

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Regulations concerning what may and may not be worn by animals on the Sabbath.

p. 91 CHAPTER V. REGULATIONS CONCERNING WHAT MAY AND MAY NOT BE WORN BY ANIMALS ON THE SABBATH. MISHNA I.: What gear may we let animals go about in and what not? 1 The male camel in a bridle; the female cannel with a nose-ring; Lybian asses in a halter, and a horse in a collar. All (animals) that are used to collars may go out in and may be led by the collar. Such gear (when it becomes defiled) can be sprinkled and submerged without being removed from its (proper) place (on the animal). GEMARA: R. Jehudah in the name of Samuel said: "Rabbi was asked, How is it when the reverse is the case? i.e., when the female camel is bridled and the male camel is invested

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Regulations concerning victuals, where they may or may not be deposited to retain their heat for the Sabbath.

p. 83 CHAPTER IV. REGULATIONS CONCERNING VICTUALS, WHERE THEY MAY OR MAY NOT BE DEPOSITED TO RETAIN THEIR HEAT FOR THE SABBATH. MISHNA I.: Wherein may hot vessels be deposited (to retain the heat) and wherein may they not? Depositing in Gepheth (olive waste), dung, salt, lime, and sand, either wet or dry, is not allowed. In straw, grape-skins, wool-flocks, or grass it is permitted, provided they are dry, but not when they are still wet. GEMARA: A question was propounded: "Is the use of olive waste only prohibited, but the use of the oil-cakes allowed; or does the Mishna allude to oil-cakes and still more so to olive waste (for it produces more heat)?" For the purpose of depositing in, both kinds are not allowed; (but if the

The Jewish Babylonian Talmud – Section Moed – Tract Sabbath – Regulations concerning stoves, hearths, and ovens.

p. 63 CHAPTER III. REGULATIONS CONCERNING STOVES, HEARTHS, AND OVENS. MISHNA I.: Cooked victuals may be put on a stove that was heated with straw or stubble. If the stove was heated with the pulp of poppy seed (i.e., poppy seed from which the oil was pressed out) or with wood, (cooked victuals) may not be put upon it, unless the (live) coals were taken out or covered with ashes. Beth Shamai says: (The latter instance) is permissible only in the case of victuals that are to be kept warm, but not of such as are improved by continued cooking. Beth Hillel says: Both alike are permitted. Beth Shamai says: (Victuals) may be taken off the stove, but not put back upon it; Beth Hillel permits it. GEMARA: The