The apostles, particularly the Twelve Apostles (aka Twelve Disciples), were the primary historical disciples of Jesus.   During the life and ministry of Jesus in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus.  While Christian tradition often refers to the apostles as being 12 in number, different gospel writers give different names for the same individual, and apostles mentioned in one gospel are not mentioned in others. After his resurrection, Jesus sent 11 of them (minus Judas Iscariot, who by then had died) to spread his teachings to all nations. The Twelve Disciples are Simon (Peter), Andrew, James, John, PhilipBartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James, Thaddaeus (Judas), Simon, and Judas Iscariot (after death, was replaced by Matthias).  Other figures sometimes referred to as apostles include Barnabas, Andronicus, Silas, Timothy, and Appolos.